Update on CIRA’s new WHOIS Policy

From the Minutes of the Canadian Internet Registration Authority (CIRA) Board of Directors Meeting held January 30, 2007:

“6. Update on WHOIS

K. von Arx updated the Board of Directors on the WHOIS implementation plan noting that staff had finalized the amendments and additions to CIRA’s Policies, Rules and Procedures necessary to implement the WHOIS privacy protections for individual Registrants. The technical implementation of the WHOIS, namely ceasing to display personal information of individual Registrants in the WHOIS, cannot proceed until the technical staff has time to analyze the amount of work required. The analysis will be prepared by March 2007 once the Membership Authentication project and changes to the Election software are completed.” 

See our posting of August 22, 2006 which discusses the proposed changes to CIRA’s WHOIS policy and the implications of those changes. From the above Board minutes, it sounds like this will become reality in the next few months.

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2 Responses

  1. [...]  See our post of February 27, 2007 for details on the status of the proposal to restrict public access to WHOIS information of registrants of .ca domain names. [...]

  2. [...] As an update to earlier posts (here and here), the Canadian Internet Registration Authority (CIRA) announced the results of its consultation with the public regarding implementing changes to the dot-ca domain name Whois Privacy Policy.  Under the proposed new policy, technical information will still be displayed on the Whois information for a dot-ca domain name but access to registrant personal information will require submission of a formal request for disclosure of such information.  There is also a proposed opt-in rule by which individual registrants may choose to have their personal information publicly accessible in the Whois database. [...]

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The authors of the Canadian Trademark Blog are all members of the Canadian law firm Clark Wilson LLP, based in Vancouver, Canada. Each author's practice focuses–either in whole or in substantial part–on Canadian intellectual property law. Together, they manage the trade-mark portfolios of local, national and international brand owners in nearly all industries and markets.

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